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Queen of Sheba

 

Thelymitra variegata – Southern Queen of Sheba

Southern Queen of Sheba Southern Queen of Sheba Southern Queen of Sheba Southern Queen of Sheba Southern Queen of Sheba leaf  Queen of Sheba  Queen of Sheba Queen of Sheba Queen of Sheba

 


 

Thelymitra speciosa – Eastern Queen of Sheba

Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba Eastern Queen of Sheba


 

Thelymitra pulcherrima – Northern Queen of Sheba

Northern Queen of Sheba Northern Queen of Sheba Northern Queen of Sheba Northern Queen of Sheba


 

Thelymitra apiculata – Cleopatra’s Needles

Due to the obvious relationships with the Queen of Sheba, T. variegata it was named as a variety of that species. David Jones and Mark Clements later elevated it to specific rank on the basis that the leaf is often curved rather than spirally twisted and the erect column lobes have distinct needle-like points.

Cleopatra's Needles Cleopatra's Needles Cleopatra's Needles Cleopatra's Needles Cleopatra's Needles

 


18 Comments

  1. Ping from Mary Ball:

    Am now seeing the photos. I was just a little impatient, I do get excited!! Excellent

  2. Ping from Daniel Martín:

    These plants are amazingly beautiful! Great pics!

  3. Ping from Esther Meura:

    Going to South West corner September and October. Would like to be blessed by the sight of some of these.

    Thanks for putting them on the net.

    Esther

  4. Ping from Jenny Irwin:

    Luckily I am going to be north of Perth in August – will I have a chance to see these amazing orchids?

  5. Ping from Lyndon & Ollie Schick:

    My wife and I have photographed both the variegata and the pulcherrima but didn’t find the eastern variety when we were over in WA. We live on the Central Coast, NSW.
    Please share with us what equipment you now use, and your techniques. Admire your pics!

    • Ping from Owen Holland:

      Are you the same Lyndon Schick who did a slide photo show at the Mayanup hall (near Boyup Brook W.A.) in the late seventies?
      A Mr Eric Chapman has got me interested in Orchids..

  6. Ping from Ian Spurgeon:

    Hi
    I have a pic of a Queen of Sheba that is very blue in colour and quite different to the others in the area, ‘Gull Rock Albany’ I was wondering if it is a different variety or the result of age and sunlight?

  7. Ping from Marina Lommerse:

    Hi Noel
    I’m a Nature painter who paints botanicals. I just painted a large scale ‘portrait of the Eastern Queen of Sheba for the World Botanical Exhibition: Wildflowers of Australia 2018. Andrew Brown provided some high resolution images. But I also used your site to refer to colours and shapes. So thanks for sharing.

    I may do further work on this wonderful flower. If so I’d love to get more high resolution photos in order to beaccuarte with the detail. Would you be willing to share-I would of course acknowledge your photos. I can email you some of my work.
    Cheers Marina from South Fremantle

  8. Ping from Deb:

    In what climate do these beauties live in? Where could they be purchased at? Beautiful! Very curious Thank you for your time. ❤️

  9. Ping from Jo Ann Moreno:

    Where can I get any of these?

  10. Ping from Karen G:

    I would love to buy one of these beautiful orchids. Is there any way I can purchase one?

  11. Ping from Adrian Twigg:

    Can the public purchase these magnificent orchids?

  12. Ping from Pat Brazier:

    Is there anywhere that I can purchase one of these Queen of Sheba orchids or are the only grown wild.

  13. Ping from Victor Dale:

    Most beautiful flower.
    I would like to share
    W8th family in Canada.

  14. Ping from Noel:

    These beautiful orchids are only found in Western Australia where they are one of this State’s most protected species.

    They cannot be picked or transplanted and can only be viewed in their natural habitat.

    They have a special relationship with a specific soil fungus and therefore cannot survive outside of that environment.

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